Adventure Travel

When you think of taking a vacation do you dream of relaxing on a beach? Or does your mind turn to something a little wilder -- an African safari or agritoursim chores?

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According to an 1885 pamphlet, a man named Thomas J. Beale buried a treasure somewhere in Virginia, and left behind what appeared to be coded messages about its location. But was it all just a hoax?

By Patrick J. Kiger

Crater of Diamonds State Park is the only public diamond mining site in the U.S. Thousands of people have dug up their own gems over the years. Some even struck it rich.

By Caroline Eubanks

Here's an Australian town where you can eat, sleep and play, all below the surface. Not surprisingly, it's starred in many movies too.

By Caroline Eubanks

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The Happiness Museum in Copenhagen explores happiness across the globe, including how it varies across regions, and why some countries, such as Denmark, are happier than others.

By Stephanie Vermillion

President Lyndon Johnson signed the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act into law in 1968 to protect U.S. rivers for future generations. Here are seven fabulous rivers you should check out.

By Katie Carman

Some folks love stargazing so much, they're willing to build their lives around it. Welcome to Deerlick Astronomy Village, where you can live the astronomical life full-time — or just visit for a dark sky party.

By Nathan Chandler

The taiga biome stretches from Alaska to Mongolia, and it's super-cold. You can totally live here, though not too many people do.

By Stephanie Vermillion

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Lake Baikal is a massive, ancient lake in the mountainous Russian region of Siberia. It's home to nearly 4,000 different species, earning it the nickname the 'Galapagos of Russia.'

By Stephanie Vermillion

A reclusive millionaire hid a treasure somewhere in the Rocky Mountains between Santa Fe, New Mexico, and the Canadian border in 2010. Some lucky hunter finally found it.

By Cherise Threewitt

The Serengeti in Africa is famous for being home to the "big five" and the annual migration of more than 1.5 million wildebeest. We'll tell you what else makes this place so special.

By Stephanie Vermillion

It sometimes seems that, with Google maps and GPS and every-step-you-take tracking, there couldn't possibly be an unturned stone anywhere on the planet, but that's far from true.

By Nathan Chandler

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People around the globe are just beginning to discover the beautiful Faroe Islands. With little crime, lovely scenery and lots of puffins, here are 11 things to know about this unique destination.

By Melanie Radzicki McManus

Four measly seasons may not be enough. The Sámi people of Lapland say their region's eight seasons better express their lifestyle and the cycles of their land. So, what are these seasons?

By Melanie Radzicki McManus

Our writer shares her experience of hiking Spain's el Caminito del Rey, once considered the world's most dangerous path. It was closed for 15 years after five people died on it and reopened in 2015 as a new, improved attraction.

By Melanie Radzicki McManus

The island of Ilha da Queimada Grande off the coast of Brazil is home to an estimated 2,000 to 4,000 venomous snakes, which translates to about one snake every 3 feet. Watch where you step.

By Jesslyn Shields

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HowStuffWorks heads to Historic Banning Mills, the world's largest zip line canopy park, to learn the science behind how zip line courses speed through the trees.

Treasure hunting may be dangerous, but it sure is super exciting. Here are five treasures people are hunting down right now.

By Mark Mancini

Solo travel is on the rise ... and it's mostly women on the go.

By Cherise Threewitt

New Zealand's public accident insurance fund has made the country a magnet for extreme sports and adventure seekers.

By Melanie Radzicki McManus

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Don't believe the hype: Not all millennials are entitled. A report on vacationing shows their age group is the most vacation-deprived of any.

By Michelle Konstantinovsky

Many articles have been written about the positive effects of travel. But can it also be too much of a good thing?

By Dave Roos

The most inhospitable continent in the world can be a surprisingly normal at times. But then you have to mail your poop home.

By Jesslyn Shields

Frenchman Guirec Soudée is sailing around the world by himself. But since everyone needs a first mate, he enlisted a laying hen.

By Jesslyn Shields

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There's something about abandoned cities that makes you curious about what happened. Here are 10 where you can satisfy that curiosity by taking a visit.

By Melanie Radzicki McManus

Thousands have summited the world's highest mountain since Hillary and Norgay made their historic climb in 1953. What's changed about that formidable trek?

By John Donovan