Running

Running isn't just a pasttime for many; it's an obsession. Running lets you escape the troubles of everyday life and disappear into your own world. In this section, you'll find articles about marathon training, running health and more.

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You've just crossed the finish line, and while it might seem like a good time to rest, instead, it's time to eat. What could you possibly want to munch on just after a long run?

By Josh Briggs

If you're training for 10K or a marathon, you don't want to halt your preparation because of a nasty cold. Is it OK to run when you're under the weather?

By Debra Ronca

If you've got the blues, it's highly likely that a jog around the block will cheer you up. Why does running have a therapeutic effect?

By Charles W. Bryant

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There's nothing like pounding the pavement to take the edge off after a bad day at work. Why is running so good at reducing stress?

By Charles W. Bryant

Gone are the days that strength training was only for bodybuilding. Buff, macho men "maxing out" on free weights have been replaced with health nuts lifting weights to stay fit. But does strength training actually help your heart and lungs?

By Sara Novak

Running exercises more than just your legs. If your stomach muscles aren't in shape, you won't be able to set your best pace. What kinds of exercises will help you strengthen those abs?

By Nathan Chandler

You've mastered the 10K, now you're ready to compete. But running to complete the race is different from running to win it. How do you change your training habits to help you compete?

By Josh Briggs

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Out of fear, need for food or fun, humans have been loping long distances since the beginning of time. But we still need to train for a 5K. How's it done?

By Nicholas Gerbis

Although the first marathon was run 2,500 years ago -- and its lone participant died in the process -- long-distance running has never been more popular. AIMS coordinates thousands of races around the world at a variety of distances, from fun runs to marathons.

By Dave Roos

To your left is a team of Elvises. To your right is Spongebob Squarepants. And up ahead, well, someone is nude. Welcome to San Francisco's infamous 12K race -- the Bay to Breakers.

By Clint Pumphrey

The same material that boings bungee jumpers from bridges is used by runners to increase muscle strength. How will this type of resistance training improve your running performance?

By Debra Ronca

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If you easily get bored with workouts, the variety involved in circuit training may appeal to you. What exercises are used in circuit training to spice up the routine?

By Victoria Vogt

Late-night infomercials advertising ab-strengthening rockers, loungers and workout DVDs insist that all you need are six-pack abs. But core strength training for runners goes beyond sculpting a washboard stomach. What can a strong core do for you?

By Victoria Vogt

All you need to run is a pair of good shoes and the open road. That said, the sport could be a lot more eco-friendly. How do the world's greenest running events toe the line?

By Dave Roos

What goes up must come down. Chances are, if you run uphill in training, your finish times in races will come down. Why is hill training so effective?

By Brian Boone

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First-time and even experienced marathon runners know it all too well: the feeling that hits around mile 20 when your legs begin to give way and you feel as if you would die if you moved another step. What's going on here, and what can you do to avoid it?

By Kevin P. Allen

If you run 15 to 40 miles per week, you're an intermediate runner. If you'd like to increase your speed for your next 5K, how should you train?

By Meredith Bower

Interval training mixes up high- and low-intensity exercises to help boost stamina. How is alternating speeds better for your body than working out at a continuous pace?

By Thorin Klosowski

Crossing your lactate threshold during a race can cause you to feel exhausted and decrease your pace. So how do you increase your lactate threshold in training?

By Melissa Sandoval

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If you're a runner, that doesn't mean you get out of exercising your legs -- strong leg muscles are especially important for runners. How do leg workouts help improve strength and stamina?

By John Kelly

Scientists once assumed that running and walking used the same amount of energy -- that is, they burned the same number of calories. However, a group of Syracuse University researchers found that running actually burns more calories than walking. What factor had scientists overlooked in the past?

By Josh Clark

When a race has thousands of participants, how on Earth can anyone keep track of the time of each individual runner? Simple -- with a little device called a timing chip.

By Kevin P. Allen

Meaghan Latone was 35 when she learned she had lung cancer. Less than two years later, the wife and nonsmoking mother of two was dead, but not before helping create a charity race to help awareness and research funds for the disease that took her life.

By John Kelly

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Around 1 percent of the world's population has run a marathon. What about people who are physically fit -- but not athletes -- who want to run a longer race than the 10K? These three mini-marathons may be the ticket.

By Brian Boone

Runners normally train by, well, running. You need strong legs and lungs to run well, but what about your back, chest and abs? Pilates strengthens those areas and improves endurance as well. Just one workout a week will make a huge difference.

By Ed Grabianowski