Prev NEXT  

Advertisement

Lake Clark National Park

The History of Lake Clark National Park

©2006 National Park Services Dick Proenneke and those who have followed him have enjoyed  the dense forest land that fringes Lake Clark. The terrain provides a habitat for a variety of creatures, including brown bears, wolves, and moose.

The name of Dick Proenneke, a pioneering homesteader, will forever be associated with Lake Clark National Park. Proenneke arrived in 1967, fell in love with the area's rugged wilderness, eventually found some good land, and built a sturdy cabin from hand-felled logs. His Thoreau-like experiment in independent living inspired a memoir, One Man's Wilderness: An Alaskan Odyssey, now considered a classic of Alaskan literature and a must-read for anyone contemplating a visit to this park.

Lake Clark National Park was created in 1980, when Jimmy Carter signed the Alaska National Interest Land Conservation Act. The park was set aside so that it could be maintained as a wilderness area and so that its population of sockeye salmon could be protected.

Advertisement

A trip to Lake Clark National Park gives visitors a chance to celebrate Alaskan wilderness. The park also enables visitors to appreciate exactly what conservation activists are trying to preserve -- not just for our enjoyment, but for future generations as well.

© Publications International, Ltd.

Related HowStuffWorks Articles

Advertisement


Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement


Advertisement


Recommended

Advertisement

Advertisement