Famous Landmarks

The world's famous landmarks inspire wonder and have been celebrated for centuries. Learn more about famous landmarks like the Eiffel Tower and the Taj Mahal.

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There's something about these interactive pedestrian puzzles that really captures people's interest. It could be the sense of accomplishment when you reach the end, or it may just be a fun activity to do with family and friends.

By Emilie Sennebogen

Besides sipping plenty of vino, you'll get to stroll the sun-drenched rows of vines and perhaps even eat a few of the grapes. What else can you expect from a wine tour?

By Amy Hunter

From Stonehenge to the Taj Mahal, see pictures of some of the world's most stunning sites.

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With a missing nose and weather-beaten body, the Sphinx really shows its age. Or does it? Some archaeologists have evidence that the Sphinx is older than the ancient Egyptians.

By Cristen Conger

Tacky is in the eye of the beholder. But trap is pretty straightforward. And when the two get tied up together, there's a good chance you're going to spend money on something absurd at a gift shop.

By Charles W. Bryant

It's nature's light show, and we'd all like a front-row seat. But these mysterious flashes of pseudo-dawn can only be seen in certain parts of the world at certain times. Where and when?

By Debra Ronca

The Parthenon was constructed thousands of years ago, but with so much pollution and so many visitors, it may not last for long. Take a look at the Parthenon in Athens, Greece.

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This futuristic Ferris wheel was only supposed to stay put for five years. But with millions of tourists boarding its capsules, the city decided to keep it around. How was it built?

By Debra Ronca

It kept the Huns out for centuries, but today it draws 10 million visitors annually. The Great Wall winds across deserts, mountains and grasslands in even the most remote reaches of China. So why has it fallen into disrepair?

By Alia Hoyt

The forbidding slopes of Mount Everest have captivated mountain climbers for decades ... though you can never really conquer Everest, merely survive it.

People say that the Congo river is murky brown, but for centuries now, historians have written about the Congo's bloody waters. Fantastic tales of death and near misses have corroborated the Congo's reputation as the heart of darkness.

By HowStuffWorks.com Contributors

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Like the imposing white marble of many Greek monuments, the impact of ancient Greek culture is still alive and well today. See and learn more about the ancient Greeks in this image gallery.

The next time you're pondering a big trip around the world, you might want to think about visiting a World Heritage site. Hundreds of them exist, and they're in some pretty cool spots.

By Jennifer Horton

Lighthouses kept sailors safe from crashing their ships on rocky coasts -- until modern technology left them obsolete. Now many of them serve as museums or lodges.

It flows south to north and it helped build Ancient Egypt. How does the mighty Nile affect the people and animals that live nearby?

By Alia Hoyt

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For most of us, hardwood floors and stainless steel appliances seem like nice upgrades. But the world's most expensive houses have heated driveways, private gyms and movie theaters. Jealous yet?

By Josh Clark & Dave Roos

When Thomas Jefferson inherited 5,000 acres of land in Charlottesville, Va., he set out to build a house with more conveniences and European influences. How long did it take him to build it, and what did he include in the plans?

By HowStuffWorks.com Contributors

There are the seven wonders of the medieval world and the modern world, as well as the seven wonders of the natural world and underwater world. But what about the original seven wonders of the world.

By HowStuffWorks.com Contributors

Much of Easter Island's haunting past remains a mystery, though clues have surfaced about the people, their culture and their fateful decline. What's the real story?

By HowStuffWorks.com Contributors

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Navesink Lighthouse on New Jersey's northern shore marks a navigational spot first found by Henry Hudson. There are few lighthouses in American that are as sturdily constructed as the Navesink Lighthouse. Learn about Navesink Lighthouse here.

By the Editors of Publications International, Ltd.

At 1,922 feet (607 meters) tall, the Burj Dubai is the new tallest building in the world -- and it's still under construction.

By Sarah Dowdey

The Boston Light lighthouse is the only lighthouse in America that continues to have resident keepers. Located ten miles east of Boston this lighthouse has guided ships into Boston Harbor for close to 300 years. Learn about the history of the Boston

By the Editors of Publications International, Ltd.

Some museums display fine art -- others opt for replica electric chairs. The unusual museums on our list showcase peculiar items from history and culture that you won’t soon forget.

By the Editors of Publications International, Ltd.

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From corn palaces to giant balls of twine, this world has plenty of strange, quirky tourist attractions. Some of our favorites are on this list.

By the Editors of Publications International, Ltd.

What makes a place romantic enough to inspire a long passionate kiss? Being together in beauty -- whether in a natural setting or a creation of the human imagination -- can certainly help affections flow freely.

By the Editors of Publications International, Ltd.