5 Tips for Keeping Kids Safe at Theme Parks


1
Communicate with Your Kids
When everyone's in the know, the whole family can have a good time at the park.
When everyone's in the know, the whole family can have a good time at the park.
Digital Vision/Thinkstock

Communication is an invaluable tool in a parent's toolkit. Start early and repeat often. Explain the rules of the theme park to your kids before you go. Explain to them (and demonstrate) proper ride behavior: standing politely in line; waiting for assistance from ride attendants; making sure restraints are secure -- and leaving them in place; keeping hands and arms inside the vehicle; staying in the seat; and following the instructions of ride operators.

Instruct kids to look around and notice who and what is around them. Make sure they know to walk -- not run -- so they avoid collisions and possible injuries to themselves and other visitors. And don't forget to warn children not to slip past barriers into restricted areas at rides and around the park. Awareness of potential dangers keeps everyone safe.

Related Articles

Sources

  • Gay, Lance. "Theme Park Safety." Tennessean. 2001. ExpertSafety.com. (May 16, 2010) http://www.expertsafety.com/articles/ThemeParkSafety.pdf
  • Good Housekeeping. "Don't Even Go There: Sizing Up the Risk of the Ride." Good Housekeeping. 2001. ExpertSafety.com. (May 17, 2010) http://www.expertsafety.com/articles/DontGo.pdf
  • Niles, Robert. "Top 10 Theme Park Safety Tips." Theme Park Insider. (May 17, 2010) http://www.themeparkinsider.com/safety/
  • Saferparks. "Injuries." Saferparks.org. 2009. (May 17, 2010) http://www.saferparks.org/safety/injuries/
  • Saferparks. "Safety Tips for Riders of All Ages." Saferparks.org. 2009. (May 17, 2010) http://www.saferparks.org/safety/tips/
  • Saferparks. "Top 10 Tips for Parents." Saferparks.org. 2009. (May 25, 2010) http://www.saferparks.org/for_parents/tips_for_parents.php

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