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Alabama Scenic Drive: The Selma to Montgomery Byway

        Adventure | South

Highlights of the Selma to Montgomery Byway
Brown Chapel is commemorated as the starting point for the historic 1965 march for voting rights.
Brown Chapel is commemorated as the starting point for the historic 1965 march for voting rights.

The pathway of the march, and the civil rights landmarks along its route, are the highlights of the Selma to Montgomery Byway.

The following tour encompasses the first section of the byway beginning on the corner of Martin Luther King, Jr., Street and Jeff Davis Avenue and passes the George Washington Carver Home, historic landmark Brown AME Church, and the Martin Luther King, Jr., monument. Through the written word and vivid historic photographs, each of the 20 memorials along the route tells the story of the individuals who came together for a common cause.

Cecil B. Jackson Public Safety Building: On the byway, the first point of interest is the Cecil B. Jackson Public Safety Building, which was once the old Selma city hall. This building served as the city and county jail in which Dr. King and other protesters were imprisoned in 1965.

Dallas County Courthouse: The Dallas County Courthouse was the destination of most protest marches in an effort to register to vote.

National Voting Rights Museum and Institute: Just before the Alabama River is the National Voting Rights Museum and Institute, dedicated to honoring the attainment of voting rights.

Edmund Pettus Bridge: Crossing the Alabama River is the Edmund Pettus Bridge, the famous landmark where "Bloody Sunday" took place on March 7, 1965.

Montgomery: From here, the byway travels along Highway 80 to Montgomery, passing numerous campsites that were used by marchers during the historic event. Between the cities of Petronia and Lowndesboro stands the memorial to Viola Liuzzo, who was murdered while supporting the civil rights movement.

Alabama State Capitol: The final destination of the Selma to Montgomery march is the Alabama State Capitol in Montgomery. On the steps of this great building, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., told marchers that even though the journey was through, the struggle for civil rights was far from over. But it would be won, he said, and it wouldn't be long.

This historical route honors the memory of civil rights marchers whose efforts helped Southern African-Americans gain access to the ballot box. Their journey ends not in Montgomery, but with passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

Find more useful information related to Alabama's Selma to Montgomery Byway:

  • Alabama Scenic Drives: The Selma to Montgomery Byway is just one of the scenic byways in Alabama. Check out the others.
  • Selma, Montgomery: Find out what there is to do in these cities along the Selma to Montgomery Byway.
  • Scenic Drives: Are you interested in scenic drives beyond Alabama? Here are more than 100 scenic drives throughout the United States.
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