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How Rock 'n' Roll Fantasy Camp Works


It's All About the Music
Rock 'n' Roll Fantasy Camp isn't like playing Rock Band on your Wii. It's working alongside some of the greats in the business, including The Who's Roger Daltrey, seen here.
Rock 'n' Roll Fantasy Camp isn't like playing Rock Band on your Wii. It's working alongside some of the greats in the business, including The Who's Roger Daltrey, seen here.
Photo by Jennifer Hammer, courtesy Rock 'n' Roll Fantasy Camp

They come to the Rock 'n' Roll Fantasy Camp from all over the world, and from different lifestyles. Surgeons, CEOs, students, stay-at-home moms -- even Homer Simpson. Some are trying to recapture the glory days of playing in their high school garage bands. Others sang in the church choir or just played guitar to no one in particular. Still others have never pounded a drum or keyed a piano in the lives. They can't carry a tune in a bag.

Make no mistake: Rock 'n' Roll Fantasy Camp isn't like playing "Rock Band" on your Nintendo Wii. It's Abbey Road Studios, it's the House of Blues, and CBGBs. It's working alongside some of the greats in the business, including Bill Wyman of the Rolling Stones, Steven Tyler of Aerosmith and Slash of Guns N' Roses [source: Rohter].

Each Rock 'n' Roll Fantasy Camp, RRFC, for short, is limited to 70 people and takes place a few times a year in different locations. Camps have been hosted in London, Tokyo, Hollywood and New York City.

Whatever the venue, when you arrive, you will have to audition. After all, this is rock 'n' roll. Once counselors determine your ability, they'll divide you into bands of six or seven with similar talent, or non-talent, as the case may be. Each group is paired with a professional musician. During the opening night party, each band will perform a song. Later, the counselors take to the stage. As the week goes on, campers learn to write and play their own music. During the last night, everyone, no matter how good or bad, performs in front of a live audience in a sort of battle of the camper bands competition [source: Luna].

Playing an instrument is not a prerequisite for the camp. After all, this is a fantasy. Classes are based on an individual's skill. At the London camp in 2007, Spike Edney from Queen was able to lead a group of beginners to victory in the battle of the bands competition. Some campers with no musical experience just come to play the tambourine and sing backup vocals. It doesn't really matter. Either way, you'll be with your rock star heroes from the first to the last day. Moreover, you'll have the opportunity to learn from other counselors at night and in special-themed jam rooms [source: RockCamp.com].


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