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10 Urban Sports That Might Get You Arrested


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Parkour
Parkour itself is not illegal, but if you practice on private property, you can get cited, fined, or even arrested for trespassing. iStockphoto/Thinkstock
Parkour itself is not illegal, but if you practice on private property, you can get cited, fined, or even arrested for trespassing. iStockphoto/Thinkstock

Parkour (aka free running) is an extreme urban sport that's all about getting from point A to point B, no matter what stands in your way [source: StreetParkour.com]. That can mean scrambling over walls, leaping between buildings, or jumping off a roof. Parkour has been influenced by buildering, an urban sport we'll talk about on the next page [source: Morrison].

Parkour itself is not illegal, but if you practice on private property, you can get cited, fined, or even arrested for trespassing, depending on local laws [source: StreetParkour.com]. It can be a high-risk activity, which is why in some situations a traceur -- someone who does parkour -- can end up in legal trouble. Sometimes, traceurs get off with a slap on the wrist while other times, they end up having to appear in court.

In Vienna, Va. in 2011, police and fire rescue had to help a stranded traceur get off of a restaurant roof. The police did not arrest the traceur, who was a minor, but they did hold him until they could release him into his mother's custody [source: Hendry]. Two Charleston, S.C. men were arrested in May 2012 for practicing parkour on a local bridge after they were banned from practicing the sport in downtown Greenville [source: Funderburg]. Firefighters rescued them after they got into trouble on the bridge, causing traffic delays for two hours. Police charged them with disorderly conduct, and they had to appear in court later that summer.


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