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Los Angeles

Hitler in L.A.? That's what Winona and Norman Stephens, California Nazi sympathizers, hoped would eventually happen when they built their ranch.

Heinrich Hoffmann/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Big draw: Murphy Ranch

In 1933, Hitler became chancellor, the Nazi party took over the German government, and Winona and Norman Stephens built a Nazi commune in Los Angeles.

Herr Fuhrer, they believed, would someday come to rule there. After Pearl Harbor was bombed, though, the place was emptied out, and its inhabitants were charged as Nazi sympathizers [source: Almendrala].

Now, the compound known as Murphy's Ranch, once a self-sustaining community that supplied its own power and water, stored its own food, and had its own bunkers just in case, is a vandalized shell of its former self [source: Almendrala]. It's accessible to the public, and people come to see what remains of a U.S.-based Nazi cult preparing for Germany's victory -- and, inexplicably, Hitler's reign from a ranch in L.A.

More to explore:

  • Griffith Park Zoo, founded in 1912, abandoned in the 1960s when construction of the larger Los Angeles Zoo was complete [source: Preuss].
  • Linda Vista Hospital, built in the early 1900s as a medical center for people injured building the new railroad, now abandoned and frightening enough to have been the filming location for a number of horror movies [source: Riggs].

Through almost all of this -- abandoned crypts, hospitals, forts and zoos, and orphanages -- runs the theme of neglect, and a resulting eeriness to which urban explorers seem irresistibly drawn. There's plenty of it to go around, with abandoned structures and towns and tunnel systems lying unnoticed all over the world, ripe for discovery and recording. All are accessible to those willing to risk fines, prison and death; quite a few are accessible to those who'd rather not.

Either way, the hidden world awaits.

For more information on urban exploration, check out the links on the next page.

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