General Triathlon Training

General triathlon training is not sport-specific; rather, it covers everything from mental toughness to endurance to flexibility.


If pain has ever kept you sidelined, maybe you just need to roll with it. Whether your tension requires professional attention or one of those foam rollers you see at the store, getting the body's connective tissue to loosen up could be just what you need.

A picturesque run through the cool, breezy mountaintops, a potential boost in performance -- what's not to like about high altitude training? Along with the inconvenience for a large number of runners who live at sea level, high altitude training isn't for everyone.

Training for a triathlon isn't easy, and the last thing you need is an injury to put a wrench in your plans. How can low intensity training help you meet your goals?

Most athletes find that massage can help with their performance. Due to thorough, rigorous workouts and a great deal of mental stress, however, triathletes in particular benefit from a good session on the massage table.

Physical strength is obviously important for athletes about to attempt a triathlon. But many argue that mental toughness is just as important. How do you prepare your mind for the event?

Triathletes allow themselves an off-season to recuperate and rebuild even stronger for the next season of competition. But is it OK to stray far from fighting-trim when there are no races on the horizon?

In preparing for triathlons, people often go to great lengths to give themselves a competitive edge. While many tend to overlook aspects such as core body strength and flexibility, the smart triathlete will utilize Pilates to build a powerful core and balance the body.

With all of the swimming, biking and running triathletes do in preparation for the big race, you'd think that that might be enough to get you to the finish line. But strength training is an important part of a triathlete's schedule, especially when endurance is such a big factor.

If the thought of taking a few extra minutes before and after your workout to help prevent injuries sounds like a stretch -- you're right. Though the experts don't agree on how much stretching really helps, there are some benefits.

Huge, rippling muscles may look good at a bodybuilding competition, but they usually make for a poor endurance athlete. You can be strong, you can be fast -- but if you're lugging around just a few more pounds, it could make the difference between success and failure.

So you've decided to train for a triathlon. Sure, the swimming, cycling and running will be grueling, but are you set for the really hard part? The part that could end with you lost and searching for your stuff amid piles of gear?

Misery loves company. No, wait, that's not how it goes. Strength in numbers -- that's it! Triathlon training groups are as varied as the athletes themselves, and finding one that's right could be the first step in helping you stick with the sport.

Whether you're a seasoned triathlon veteran or just someone considering testing your swimming, cycling and running skills for the first time, the help of a coach can help improve your performance. But finding the right mentor takes more effort than randomly selecting someone from the phone book.

Just as different types of cars have different fuel needs, triathletes have different nutritional requirements from the rest of the population. How many protein bars, energy gels and calorie-heavy meals do triathletes need to pack into their training program?

Think you have what it takes to compete in a triathlon? Chances are you do, but before signing up for the next available race, you'll want to be adequately prepared for the challenge ahead.

Triathlons are an intense physical and mental test for athletes. They challenge an athlete's strength, endurance and discipline. But is it possible to get a good triathlon workout in the cold?

As you might expect, a triathlete has to be in great shape. But even someone in excellent physical condition has to spend weeks training for a competition. What if the weather doesn't cooperate?

Deciding to run a triathlon, whether it's the sprint version or a full-fledged Ironman, is a major commitment. Making sure your body gets the right combination of carbohydrates, protein, vitamins and hydration can mean the difference between a successful race and a painful ordeal.

Some athletes try to improve their performance by determining their maximal oxygen consumption, or VO2 max. How do you find this out, and what does this number really mean?

Yoga for triathletes pushes a combination of strength, flexibility and concentration into its routines. The idea is to build up the core muscle groups. Are you using yoga to prepare for the next competition?

In a quick-fix society, the idea of taking a pill to make a problem go away seems very appealing. But for athletes who participate in endurance sports, harmless-seeming over-the-counter pain relievers can cause quite a bit of damage.