CPR…For a Fish

In an effort to maintain strong trout populations, or many fish for that matter, catch and release fishing techniques have become more and more popular. If your fish becomes unconscious, get a firm grip and place it back in the water. Guide its body back and forth through the water, allowing water into the gills. After the fish gains strengths and begins to fight you, let it go [source: Troutlet].

River Trout Fishing Tips

In the end, trout fishing is really about understanding the fish and applying that knowledge. H­ere are five main tips to help you succeed:

  • Be organized: Fly fishing is fast paced compared to still water fishing. Even when the fish aren't biting, you've got the current catching, pulling and dragging your line. Wear a fishing vest and be sure to have plenty of flies on hand. You'll need them.
  • Where are you most likely to find the fish? Find the run of the river, and you're most likely to see a high number of trout.
  • Take in your surroundings: When you first arrive, find a high spot and look at the run. Try to find objects, like boulders, river bends or trees branches that are touching the water. Then watch for any sort of movement around these objects and they provide great shelter for trout.
  • Be calm and wear drab clothing. We know not to spook the unintelligent trout. Wearing drab clothes is just another way to blend into your surroundings and stay out of the trout's sight [source Kugler].
  • Your reel should be oiled before you go out. It's an exciting form of fishing and the equipment must be conditioned.
  • Always make sure you've checked on necessary permits and laws pertaining to river fishing before you make your trip.
  • Remember to check the water temperature for ideal conditions. Trout are most active when the water is between 55 and 65 degrees Fahrenheit (12.7 and 18.3 degrees Celsius). Any warmer or colder than that means the trout will be lazier than it already is!

­