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How Lake Trout Fishing Works


Fly fishing is a distinct and ancient angling method, most renowned as a method for catching trout and salmon.
Fly fishing is a distinct and ancient angling method, most renowned as a method for catching trout and salmon.
Keith Douglas/All Canada Photos/Getty Images

Whether­ you're looking for trophy-sized fish, peaceful scenery, good flavor or a good fight, think about fishing for lake trout. You might get a lot of fight -- and a lot of fish. The largest lake tr­out ever caught weighed in at 102 pounds (46.2 kilograms) [Source: Freshwater Fishing Canada].

You can fish for lake trout throughout most of the year, depending on how icy your favorite lake gets. And you'll get a fantastic meal -- or, if you're lucky, a dozen of them.

Lake trout have a lot of nicknames; it's possible you've already fished for lake trout and not known it. In some areas they're known as lakers. Because of the fish's high fat content, they're also known simply as fat. Other names, such as Macki­naw, Siscowet or Namaycush, are rooted in Native American languages. You might also have heard of them as humper, char, gray trout, paperbelly or landlocked salmon.

­In this article, we'll take a look at the different conditions of habitat and weather that affect lake trout fishing. We'll also go into some detail about the two most popular techniques, jigging and trolling. But first, the all-important question: Where do you want to go fishing?


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