Who's Looking for You, Savory Salmon?

In addition to anglers, salmon need to be on the lookout for several other predators both in the water and out. Seals, eels, sharks, otters and large fish are all predators that coexist with salmon. Out of the water, salmon are vulnerable to bears and a slew of predatory birds, including the cormorant, osprey, blue heron and kingfisher [Source: Salmon Predators].

Salmon Fishing with Egg Sacks

For anglers who seek a less artificial fi­shing experience, using egg sacks to catch salmon is a method that is both natural and effective. It has been proven that during salmon spawning season, fishing with egg sacks is the most prosperous method because many fish will bypass all other baits and lures. If you'd like to capitalize on the rivers and streams overflowing with salmon during spawning season, make sure to check when each salmon species spawns and plan your trip accordingly.

Fish eggs are used individually and bundled in sacks. Egg sacks typically contain 10 to 15 eggs in each sack and can be found at many sporting goods stores and tackle and bait shops. If you're looking to get your paws dirty, you can collect your own eggs, mix your own egg cure and construct your own egg sacks [Source: Lake Michigan Angler].

Egg sacks are made up of cured salmon or trout eggs, which are then grouped in spawn netting and attached to the fish hook at the end of your line. Be careful not to burst any of the eggs when attaching the egg sack to the hook because this will decrease their luring potential. Cast the egg sack into the water and let it drift to the bottom without reeling in order to imitate a natural grouping of fish eggs [Source: Hoffman].

If you can't stomach egg sacks, or if you don't want to deal with the extra hassle, you can always use plastic beads that imitate the size and color of salmon eggs. The beads are sold individually and are tied onto the end of your fishing line near the hook. Much like the actual fish eggs, the imitation beads can be used successfully solo or grouped together. [Source: Shuster]

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