Birds of a Feather

Crappie fish tend to stick together and travel in schools. This provides a light challenge in the fact that this mobile fish moves around a lot. You'll need to pay close attention to which direction they're headed. The advantage for you? Find one crappie and you're likely to discover almost 20 others nearby [source: Curwensville Lake Fishing].

Where to Find Crappie

Come out, ­come out, wherever you are!

Though crappies are abundant and seen as an easy fish to catch, that doesn't mean you can just go cast your line and find success. A basic understanding of crappie habitats will help you on your trip.

­Most commonly, you'll find white or black crappie when fishing. Black crappie can handle water that's a bit deeper and clearer than the white crappie can. Appropriately, they also don't mind the water being a bit cooler. This is helpful if you've set your sights on one type of crappie over the other.

Overall, your best bet for finding crappie is fishing in large ponds and the shallow parts of lakes with sand and mud on the bottom. Lakes are especially abundant because they have a wider range of wildlife and vegetation, providing food and coverage. This is a key to finding where the crappies are.

So coverage is what we need right? Then get to know your favorite fishing spot as well as you can. Any water with points, inlets, holes, sunken islands, dams, submerged objects, reeds or weeds is prime real estate for the crappie [source: Take Me Fishing]. Those formations all provide the necessary coverage that the crappie seeks out. If you remember that, than you can use logic to figure out where you can hunt for fish.

Remember, structures in the water create shallows. The shallows allow underwater vegetation to grow. The vegetation will attract all sorts of water creatures, especially little baitfish that need coverage and shallow water. Finally (and hopefully the term baitfish clued you in!) game fish come to these structures looking for the little fish and coverage [source: Take Me Fishing].