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Climbing

As these Climbing articles explain, climbers need strength and finesse whether rock climbing or scaling Mount Everest. Learn about the different types of climbing and techniques.

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How Climbing Mount Everest Works

More than 2,200 people have succeeded, but nearly 200 have lost their lives attempting to climb Mount Everest. So why do it? The most famous answer, from climber George Mallory: "Because it is there."


Junko Tabei, the First Woman to Conquer Everest, Has Died

Junko Tabei, the first woman to climb Everest, died at the age of 77. Learn more about Junko Tabei and Mt. Everest in this HowStuffWorks Now article. See more »

How Tree Climbing Works

Tree climbing is not longer just a children's activity. Visit HowStuffWorks to learn all about tree climbing. See more »

What is the history of rock climbing?

What is the history of rock climbing? Visit HowStuffWorks to learn the history of rock climbing. See more »

How to Calculate Climbing Grade

Want to know how to calculate climbing grade? Visit HowStuffWorks to learn how to calculate climbing grade. See more »

How Climbing Gear Works

Climbing gear is sophisticated gear that is rigorously tested. Visit HowStuffWorks to learn all about climbing gear. See more »

What are the most common rock climbing terms?

What are the most common rock climbing terms? Visit HowStuffWorks to learn the most common rock climbing terms. See more »

Top 10 Mountains to Climb

The top 10 mountains to climb will push your skills to the limits. Read about the top mountains and best climbs in the world. See more »

Can you ice climb a waterfall?

Waterfall climbing is an advanced form of ice climbing, and you'll need special skills to scale this ice. Learn more about waterfall climbing skills. See more »

How Ice Climbing Works

Ice climbing is a lot like rock climbing, except you're climbing a completely different surface. Learn more about ice climbing and ice climbing gear. See more »

How Altitude Sickness Works

Altitude sickness generally occurs at 8,000 feet, and high altitude sickness can really take a toll on your body. Learn about altitude sickness and its effects. See more »