Is the local park a perfect place for a family reunion?

AP Photo/Cameron Bloch

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When you get an invitation to a family reunion, your response probably goes one of two ways:

The invitation can be greeted with joy at the prospect of seeing old loved ones and meeting new additions to the family. Or, depending on how you feel about your relatives or in-laws, it can also be met with slumped shoulders and a groan, along with the need to take some ibuprofen.

But let's say you get tapped to organize the reunion, or decide to throw one on your own. Planning a family reunion takes a lot of work. Who gets invited? Where do you hold it? Will you have food or drinks? Is it going to be a sort of big family vacation? How much do you want to spend?

Obviously, every family is unique in its own way. Sometimes a family reunion can involve hundreds of people from the same clan. Other times, it means getting to see just a few aunts, uncles and cousins that you haven't seen in a long time. If you're in charge of planning the reunion, it's your call on how big you want to go. Family reunions can involve family vacations to Disney World, cruises, camping trips, barbecues in the backyard and just about everything in between.

In this article, we'll discuss the logistics of planning family reunions, and offer some tips on how to decide exactly what to do.