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10 Ways to Survive a Snowstorm


5
Snuggle Up
Forget hypothermia and frostbite -- curl up on your bearskin rug and sip a hot totty.
Forget hypothermia and frostbite -- curl up on your bearskin rug and sip a hot totty.
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If your home loses power in a snowstorm and you ­have no backup heating syste­m, developing hypothermia is a very real possibility. Simply said, hypothermia is when your body loses more heat than it can produce.

What you should watch out for:

  • Slurred speech
  • Stiff joints
  • Loss of coordination
  • Slow pulse
  • Uncontrollable shivering
  • Loss of bladder control
  • Puffy face
  • Mental confusion

The human body is a machine that can only operate at the same consistent temperature on the thermometer -- 98.6 degrees. If hypothermia sets in and you aren't able to warm your body, you could die. If you feel like hypothermia is beginning, warm yourself as quickly as you can. Use blankets, sleeping bags and layers of clothing. If you're with someone, snuggle up to borrow some of their body heat. Drink something warm, and then apply warm towels or water bottles to the head, neck, armpits and groin area to raise the core temperature. If you're able to, get to a hospital for treatment [source: WebMD].

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